A Sense of Place

I am scared of people

who play oppression Olympics 

in the comfort of their fancy lawns

and posh cafes on the weekend.

And I sit in these cafes uncomfortably numb

at the edge of these chairs

because I know I don't belong here,

waiting for someone who might ask me to leave

-Street Store Dolls, Week 05

 

Click on 'Read' on any of the thumbnails to go to the page with ALL the artworks under this theme and read reflections and more

NAVIGATION

8.jpg

Cards of Belonging

2.jpg

Portals

4.jpg

Kaagaz

7.jpg

Counting Privileges

2.jpg

Blackjack

with Labels

2.jpg

The Shades of Our Names

5.jpg

Through the Alleys

W3.jpg

Hello, Goodbye

W10.jpg

Jealous Gaze

3.jpg

The Roots that Hold Us

7.jpg

The

Last Supper

8.jpg

Meat Them

 

DESCRIPTION:  This is a collage of thumbnails of the artistic responses that are part of this theme. Each thumbnail of the image has a background that corresponds to the week in which it was submitted. There are 14 artworks under this theme. This is the colour scheme and the total number of images for each week: Week 1,peach: 1, Week 2, light green:2,, Week 4,light purple: 1, Week 5,light blue: 1, Week 7,light yellow:2, Week 9,mustard:5. Week 10, dark purple:1

 

There can be no identity, position, idea or even a body independent of spatial and temporal location. These material realities are indispensable to all embodied and emotional experiences. Disembodiment or the ability to speak from a place from nowhere is a privilege that is available only to a minority. However nuanced an insight might be, a close analysis of the acknowledgement of the social origins of its author raises interesting questions about the process of creating art itself and who has the prerogative to speak and to be heard. But besides being critical of the absence of spatial and temporal markers, their absence could also be interpreted as an attempt to convey a general truth that is independent of particular positions. In this sense, to not situate oneself is perhaps an attempt to situate oneself within broader structures and locations beyond one’s immediate social locations.